Family-School Teams

“Family life is our first school for emotional learning.”

“Schools and families are both partners in the healthy development of the child. When families and schools work together, the benefits for students— academically, socially, and emotionally—are magnified. Students who experience strong connections between their homes and their schools:

  • Attend school more regularly and achieve higher scores on standardized tests
  • Have better records of attendance
  • Are less likely to be placed in special education
  • Are more likely to avoid high-risk behaviors such as substance abuse or violence
  • Show improved behavior in homes and at school, and
  • Display better social skills and adjustment to school.

Family-School Teams:

These teams—which typically include parents, teachers, and school administrators—make decisions about designing and implementing programs, often for parent involvement and student support. When parents are actively involved in making decisions about school practices, then they and other parents enjoy programs and activities that truly address their needs.

“Schools and families are both partners in the healthy development of the child. When families and schools work together, the benefits for students— academically, socially, and emotionally—are magnified.”

In spite of all the obstacles, most parents and teachers want to establish better ways of cooperating that support the healthy development and school success of children. How can parents be good partners with the schools in the education of their children? Studies suggest that children benefit socially, emotionally, and academically when parents:

  • Set high standards for children’s educational activities and support learning in the home environment
  • Communicate with children about school-related matters such as homework and school programs
  • Supervise children’s activities, such as homework, television viewing, and after-school time, and
  • Participate in school events, such as volunteering or attending parenting workshops.

A recent national poll found that 86% of young people between the ages of 10 and 17 said their parents were very important influences on their lives. In contrast, only 22% reported that television, movies, and popular music occupied a place of special importance. No one can take the place of parents in raising caring, confident, capable children.